December 2:  Two-Word Allusion Day

Two speeches given by American presidents on this date in the 1800s launched key ideas that would influence the growth and influence of the United States.

James Monroe White House portrait 1819.gifThe first speech, given on December 2, 1823 by President James Monroe, launched the Monroe Doctrine. In his State of the Union Address, Monroe announced that the United States would frown upon any further interference or colonization of the Americas by foreign powers (1).

The second speech, given on December 2, 1845 by President James Polk, launched the term Manifest Destiny. In his State of the Union Address, Polk made it clear that he was committed to the expansion of the United States through the annexation of Texas, the acquisition of the Oregon territory, and the purchase of California from Mexico. Although he did not use the term Manifest Destiny in his speech, the term, originally coined by journalist John L. O’Sullivan, became the operative term to describe the expansion of the young nation, which happened to be the primary subject of Polk’s speech (2).

Today’s Challenge: Two Words – American History

Manifest Destiny and Monroe Doctrine are just two examples of several two-word appellations for key events or ideas in American history.  Below are several examples of two-word allusions from American history.  Each of these references represents a key story involving real people and real events that influenced the course of American history:

Boston Massacre

Burr-Hamilton Duel

Constitutional Convention

Dred Scott

Emancipation Proclamation

First Amendment

Great Society

Homestead Act

Mason-Dixon Line

Mayflower Compact

Mexican War

Missouri Compromise

New Deal

Northwest Passage

Oregon Trail

Plymouth Rock

Stamp Act

Teapot Dome

Underground Railroad

Whiskey Rebellion

Wounded Knee

Scopes Trial

XYZ Affair

Select one of the two-word allusions above, and research the story behind it.  Write a brief report explaining what happened, who was involved, and why these two words are an important part of the story of the Unites States.

(Common Core Writing 2 – Expository)

Quotation of the Day: The whole enterprise of this nation, which is not an upward, but a westward one, toward Oregon, California, Japan, etc., is totally devoid of interest to me, whether performed on foot, or by a Pacific railroad…. It is perfectly heathenish,—a filibustering toward heaven by the great western route. No; they may go their way to their manifest destiny, which I trust is not mine…. I would rather be a captive knight, and let them all pass by, than be free only to go whither they are bound. What end do they propose to themselves beyond Japan? What aims more lofty have they than the prairie dogs? -Henry David Thoreau

1 – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monroe_doctrine

2 – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_Destiny

12/2 TAGS:  allusion, speech, Monroe, James, Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, O’Sullivan, John L., Polk, James

January 10:   Rubicon Day

On this date in 49 BC Julius Caesar made a momentous decision that transformed a small Italian river into powerful metaphor.

César (13667960455).jpgPrior to 49 BC Caesar served as conquering Roman general, expanding the Roman Empire as far north as Britain.  His most notable conquest came in Gaul, the area of Europe that today includes France, Belgium and Switzerland.  By winning the Gallic wars, Caesar made Gaul a Roman province and established himself as its governor.  

Although Caesar expanded the territory of the Roman republic, his rivals feared his ambition and envied his success.  Caesar’s most notable foe was a rival Roman general named Pompey.  In January 49 BC, Pompey convinced the Roman Senate to send a message to Caesar, commanding him to leave his army and return to Rome.  

This message is what led to Caesar’s faithful decision to cross the Rubicon River.  He knew that returning to Rome alone without his army would surely lead to his demise, but to take his army across the Rubicon and into Italy was against Roman law and was essentially a proclamation of civil war.  Knowing the consequences of his actions and that there would be no turning back, Caesar boldly lead his army across the river as he uttered, “The die is cast!” — a gambling metaphor that means once a player throws (casts) the dice (plural form of die), he has reached a point of no return.

Caesar’s bold gamble payed off.  He defeated Pompey, and when Caesar eventually arrived at the gates of Rome, he was proclaimed dictator for life (1).

Today, “Crossing the Rubicon” has become a metaphor for any courageous commitment to moving in a bold new direction for which there is no turning back.

Today’s Challenge:  Mapping Metaphors

What are some examples of geographical sites that evoke a universal theme, such as courage, failure, change, or nonconformity?  What is the story or history behind how this place acquired its abstract meaning?  Like the Rubicon, other geographical sites have acquired meaning beyond just a name on a map.  The history of what happened in each of the places listed below has made each site a metaphor for some abstract idea or universal theme.  Select one of the place names below, and research the story behind how it acquired its metaphoric meaning.  Write a paragraph explaining as clearly as possible the location of your selected site and the story behind its meaning.

Waterloo

Watergate

Alcatraz

Agincourt

Alamo

Bedlam

Bohemia

Chappaquiddick

Damascus

Dunkirk

Fort Knox

The Bay of Pigs

Siberia

My Lai

(Common Core Writing 2:  Expository)

Quotation of the Day:  Language is the Rubicon that divides man from beast.  –Max Muller

1-http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/caesar.htm