September Seventeenth:  Univocalic Day

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A univocalic is a piece of writing where the writer uses only a single vowel. Because September Seventeenth contains only the vowel ‘e,’ it’s the perfect day to celebrate this rare but interesting writing form.

One classic example of a univocalic was written by C.C. Bombaugh in 1890.  He used just the vowel ‘O’:

No cool monsoons blow soft on Oxford dons,

Orthodox, jog-trot, book-worm Solomons

The following are some examples of some fairly common words in English that are Univocalic:

Only A:  craftsman, awkward, paragraph, papal, saga, maharajah, bacchanal, Taj Mahal, lasagna

Only E:  sentences, cleverness, eschew, precedents, vehement, resentment, Greece, legends, sleeplessness, cheerlessness

Only I:  writing, criticism, bikini, nihilistic, dimwits, diminish, twilight, intrinsic, Viking, siblings

Only O:  bookshop, proctor, how-to book, rococo, bookworms, protocol, orthodox, Woodstock, voodoo

Only U:  untruth, numbskull, succubus, hummus, murmur, humdrum, humbug, dumbstruck, ruckus, guru

Today’s Challenge: One Vowel Howl

How many words can you list that contain only a single vowel, as in ‘September,’ ‘bookworm,’ or ‘Mississippi’?  Pick a single vowel, and make a list of words that contain only that vowel. Then, use your list of words as ideas for a univocalic composition, such as a haiku, the first sentence of a short story, or a newspaper headline.  Hold a Univocalic Day contest or reading so you can share your creations. (Common Core Writing 2 – Expository)

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