March 13:  Anachronism Day

On this day in 2012, The New York Times announced that the Encyclopedia Britannica would no longer produce its print edition.

First published in 1768, the Encyclopedia Britannica became the most recognized and authoritative reference work ever published in English.  Its more than 4,000 contributors included Nobel Prize winners and American presidents.

In the 1950s, the Britannica was sold door-to-door, and many American families invested in the multi-volume repository of knowledge, paying in monthly installments.  The last print edition, produced in 2010, consisted of 32 volumes and weighed 129 pounds. Its price tag was $1,395.

Before the internet, generations of students spent countless hours immersed in the pages of print encyclopedias.  The advent of the digital age, however, changed the way everyone accesses knowledge. The launch of Wikipedia — the online, open-source encyclopedia — on January 15, 2001 began the trend of internet-based reference sources.  

After 244 years in print, Britannica clearly saw the handwriting on the wall and shifted its focus to its online dictionary (1).

Today the multi-volume encyclopedia is an anachronism, something that belongs to another era or something that is conspicuously old-fashioned, such as a telephone booth or an 8-track tape.

Today’s Challenge:  Old School’s in Session

What are some things from the past that no longer exist or are near extinction (such as drive-in movies, VHS tapes, handkerchiefs, boom boxes, chalkboards)?  Brainstorm a list of things you remember warmly from the past, things that are no longer around today or things that are near extinction.  Select one item from your list that you have nostalgic feelings about. Write about why you have such fond memories about it. A note on the word nostalgia:  The word nostalgia comes to English from Greek, combining nostos (‘return home’) and algos (‘pain’).  When the word entered English in the 18th century it meant “homesickness,” but today it refers to “a sentimental longing for the past.”  (Common Core Writing 2 – Expository)

Quotation of the Day:  Remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were.  -Marcel Proust



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