June 17:  Essay Question Day

On this day in 1901, the College Board Examination, the precursor of today’s SAT, was first administered.  The testing came about after presidents of twelve leading universities formed the College Entrance Examination Board.  The purpose of this organization was to create a more uniform college admissions process and to encourage New England boarding schools to develop a uniform curriculum (1).  In 69 locations a total of 973 test takers completed examinations in English, French, German, Latin, Greek, history, chemistry, and physics.

Although today’s SAT is primary a multiple choice test, the test administered in 1901 was made up entirely of essay questions.  After the test takers wrote their essays in answer books, their essays were read and evaluated by experts in each subject. Each essay was rated Excellent, Good, Doubtful, Poor, or Very Poor.

Today’s Challenge:   Say It in an Essay

What are five good questions you might ask a college candidate in order to assess his or her readiness for college?  Subject-related essay questions remain a common form by which students are tested.  In fact, the word “essay” originates from the Latin exigere, meaning “to examine, try, or test” (2). Another common form of essay questions are the ones that students must answer as a part of the college application process.

The following questions are examples of Common Application Essay Prompts.  For these essays students must write between 250-650 words:

2017-2018 Common Application Essay Prompts

  1. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  2. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?
  3. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?
  4. Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma – anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.
  5. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.
  6. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?
  7. Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.  (3)

Select one of the questions above, and write your own essay.

(Common Core Writing 1 – Argument)

Quotation of the Day:  The drama of the essay is the way the public life intersects with my personal and private life. It’s in that intersection that I find the energy of the essay. -Richard Rodriguez

1-http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/sats/where/timeline.html

2-http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=essay

3-http://www.commonapp.org/whats-appening/application-updates/common-application-announces-2017-2018-essay-prompts

May 26: Replete With Ts Day

On this day in 1927, Henry Ford watched as the last Ford Model T rolled off the assembly at his factory in Highland Park, Michigan.  Introduced in 1908, the Model T was the first car that was mass-produced on an assembly line. Its 20-horsepower, four-cylinder engine could reach a maximum of 45 miles per hour. 

By 1918, one of every two cars on U.S. roads were black Model Ts.  As Ford famously said, “Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black.”  In 1999, the Ford Model T was named The Car of the Century by the Global Automotive Elections Foundation (1).

Just as the Model T was at one time ubiquitous on U.S. roads, the letter T remains the most ubiquitous of all consonants in written English.  In fact, Ts are so prevalent that writing students might attempt to write compositions replete with Ts.

Today’s Task:  Composition Replete With Ts Contest

What types of writing compositions contain Ts?  Attempt to write a composition in which every word contains at least one T.  Brainstorm composition types first; then, try to construct the most tremendous, t-ladened masterpiece written this century.

Composition Types to Try:

Tall Tales, Narratives, Descriptions, Editorials, Creative Non-fiction, Skits, Worksheets, Advertisements, Diatribes, Tongue-Twisters, Letters, Fact Sheets, Timed Tests, Textbooks, Telegrams, Detective Stories, Fantasies, Gothic Tomes, Metaphors, Mysteries, Eyewitness Accounts, Reflections, Arguments, Tragedies, Reports, Interviews, Abstracts, Short Stories, Sonnets, Alliterative Poetry, TV Sitcom Scripts

Contest Criteria:  creativity, clarity, jocularity, lucidity, timeliness, style, originality, plot, character development, tone, diction, detail, organization, craftsmanship, editing, syntax, sentence variety, grammatical correctness.

Caution:  Writing compositions replete with Ts might turn tragic.  Students often get addicted. They can’t stop writing with Ts.  Therefore, trust this caveat: try to contain writing to ten contest entries tops.  Thanks.

Quotation of the Day:  Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it. -Henry Ford

1-https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2013/08/05/model-t-facts.html

 

April 15:  Deliberately Bad Writing Day

Today is the deadline for a delightful contest for deplorable writing: The Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest (BLFC), where entrants face the challenge of writing the worst possible opening sentence to a novel. The contest began in 1982, created by Scott Rice of the San Jose State University English Department.

The contest is named after the prolific Victorian novelist Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton (1803-1873). He was a contemporary of Dickens, and in the 19th century, his novels were nearly as popular as Dickens’. Bulwer-Lytton’s flair for the melodramatic has inspired more than twenty years of good bad writing, “writing so deliberately rotten that it both entertains and instructs,” according to Scott Rice.

Here’s the famous opening of Bulwer-Lytton’s novel Paul Clifford (1830):

It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents — except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the housetops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness.

An overall winner is selected in the contest each year, but there are also category winners for various genres, including western, detective, romance, and science fiction. Below is the overall winner for the 2002 contest, written by Rephah Berg of Oakland, California:

On reflection, Angela perceived that her relationship with Tom had always been rocky, not quite a roller-coaster ride but more like when the toilet-paper roll gets a little squashed so it hangs crooked and every time you pull some off you can hear the rest going bumpity-bumpity in its holder until you go nuts and push it back into shape, a degree of annoyance that Angela had now almost attained.

For more past contest winners, visit:  http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/

Today’s Challenge: The Good, the Bad, and the Funny

What are some examples of bad ways to begin a story?  Get a head start on next year’s Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest. Read the rules below; then, write your own one-sentence masterpiece.

The rules of the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest are simple:

Each entry must consist of a single sentence but you may submit as many entries as you wish. Sentences may be of any length (though you go beyond 50 or 60 words at your peril), and entries must be “original” (as it were) and previously unpublished.

Surface mail entries should be submitted on index cards, the sentence on one side and the entrant’s name, address, and phone number on the other.

Email entries should be in the body of the message, NOT in an attachment. If you are submitting multiple entries, please include them in one message.

Entries will be judged by categories, from “general” to detective, western, science fiction, romance, and so on. There will be overall winners as well as category winners.

The official deadline is April 15 (a date that Americans associate with painful submissions and making up bad stories). The actual deadline may be as late as June 30.

The contest accepts submissions every day of the livelong year.

Wild Card Rule: Resist the temptation to work with puns like “It was a stark and dormy night.” Finally, in keeping with the gravitas, high seriousness, and general bignitude of the contest, the grand prize winner will receive . . . a pittance.

Send your entries to: Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest Department of English San Jose State University San Jose, CA 95192-0090,

Quotation of the Day: The pen is mightier than the sword. –Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton