March 4:  National Grammar Day

Today is National Grammar Day, which was established in 2008 by Martha Brockenbrough of the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar (SPOGG). On this day, it is imperative that we all “March forth!” and honor the conventions of English that help us all communicate more clearly.

Brockenbrough founded National Grammar Day to raise awareness of language, to show why it matters, and to change some of the negative attitudes that people have about grammar:

For me, the goal is to get people to think about language and why being careful with it matters . . . . There was this idea out there that speaking well and knowing what words mean and how they work was somehow elite and untrustworthy. This is ridiculous. You’d never hear anyone complain that a doctor knows too darn much about brain surgery or their mechanic is too careful when it comes to fixing cars. (1)

Assert yourself on National Grammar Day.  Craft sentences with confidence. Punctuate with purpose, and compose confidently. March forth, and write imperative sentences — the kind of sentence that command, that begin with a verb, and that have implied subjects (“You” march forth.)

Today’s Challenge:  Write Now

What are some examples of two-word imperative sentences, such as “March forth.”?  Brainstorm a list of verbs from A to Z.  Then try to match up each of your verbs with a second word that will form a two-word imperative sentences.

Examples:

Ask nicely.  Be positive.  Carpe diem.  Don’t touch.  Exercise cognitively.  Floss daily.  Golf daily.  Help me.  Just sing.  Keep calm.  Listen carefully.  Make cookies.  Never whine. Offer hope.  Please shower.  Quiz often.  Read daily. Sing loudly.  Think big.  Use caution.  Visit Europe.  Work hard.  X-ray injuries. Yelp barbarically.  Zip it.

(Common Core Language 3 – Knowledge of Language)

Quotation of the Day:  Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature’s inexorable imperative. -H.G. Wells

1- “A Toast to National Grammar Day.